Monday, January 11, 2010

Gefilte chicken

Fine, since nobody posts anything, I’ll do another food post.

Everybody knows gefilte fish. But what about gefilte chicken? Click on the images to enlarge (and sorry for the quality).



67 comments:

The Real Shliach said...

A recipe please?

e said...

looks delicious and very russian.

theRealPianist said...

Quality of the pictures or of the food? :d

Crawling Axe said...

Overall here.

Crawling Axe said...

Stuffed chicken neck.

1. Flay the chicken preserving the skin. Alternatively, remove the meat.
2. Saw the skin in such a way that only a small opening through which to put the stuffing is left.
3. Chop onions very finely, and mix very well with chicken fat, pressing firmly with a spoon, adding, from time to time, some flour. If you want, you can add some of that meat (very little), also finely minced. Add spices or whatever else you want.
4. After the stuffing is very nicely uniform, fill the chicken with it. I think in my family the saw the opening closed.
5. Cook in the oven or roast.
6. Before eating (especially if served on Shabbos or to small children), remember to take out the string (although for a little older small children, it’s fun to remove the string themselves — that’s one of the highlights of sheika).

Did you know that bears mostly eat skin and fat, leaving the meat for smaller animals?

Crawling Axe said...

On that web-site, they also recommend adding liver, pupiks, eggs and something called “manna” (or manka) in Russian, which Google translates as “semolina”, although I remain skeptical (I think it’s the actual mann). Also, they add all that to chicken broth and finely mix. In our family they do a simpler recipe like I described, although liver and pupiks sound good.

Crawling Axe said...

e, the only thing that’s not authentically Russian in that picture is Corona with lime. I don’t think my great-grandmother had that. Although I can imagine her having some Baltica beer with her son-in-law (my grandfather) over a sheika.

e said...

in yiddish "mon" is poppy seeds.

Crawling Axe said...

Hmm. But poppy in Russian is “mak”, not “manka”. Plus, manka is white. Porridge made out of manka is given in the kindergarten. Children of the proletariat families love it, and children of intelligentsia families hate it.

The Real Shliach said...

Did you love or hate it?

(notice my subtle line of questioning?)

Crawling Axe said...

My family has hated manka ever since we can remember (probably even before they moved to Shpola, which was quite a while ago).

e said...

shpola as in the shpoler zeide?

The Real Shliach said...

Did your grandfather hate it?

Crawling Axe said...

And it’s not a subtle question at all. It’s like asking: “Did your grandfather read Tehillim or learn Gemara the night of Rosh HaShana?”

e said...

if you had two grandfathers, did you call the one from shpola "the shpoler zeide"?

The Real Shliach said...

Which is which?

Crawling Axe said...

e, yes. Before they moved to Yekatirinoslav around Reb Leivik’s time.

TRS, yes, even though my grandfather’s family was not from Shpola, but from Simferopol in Crimea.

Crawling Axe said...

e, neither of my grandfathers was from shpola. But my grandmother’s grandfather probably was.

The Real Shliach said...

So learning equals proletariat or bourgeois?

Crawling Axe said...

There was no bourgeois in Russia. All bourgeois were either shot, made poor, send to the camps, or emmigrated to Paris or Berlin in the 20s. Intelligentsia (the educated and refined class) were equally poor. Sometimes more so, because being a plumber paid more than being a physics professor.

Although, a plumber could be a member of intelligentsia. The plumber in the famous drinking scene is intelligent (even though he is drinking because his girlfriend concealed from him that she is earning more money than him, which is not a very refined behavior).

The Real Shliach said...

So learning equals intelligentsia or proletariat?

Crawling Axe said...

Intelligentnost’ means eidelkeit. Which includes learning, but also personal refinement, opposite of grubkeit. A Russian physics professor who swears and spits on the street is not an intelligent. (I am saying “Russian”, because a Jew could never do that physically.)

Anton Chekhov has an interesting definition of an intelligent: It’s someone who not just pretends not to notice ketchup spilled on the white table clothe, but takeh doesn’t notice it.

Crawling Axe said...

Intelligentsia were called “prosloika”, the middle layer. Between peasants and workers. But there were also bureaucrats, who were not part of the sandwich, I guess.

The Real Shliach said...

So which does a proletariat do on Rosh Hashanah, learn or say Tehillim?

Crawling Axe said...

Oh, I wasn’t talking about proletaria vs. intelligentsia there. I was talking about snags vs. Lubavitchers.

The Real Shliach said...

Oh. Forgive me.

Crawling Axe said...

No worries at all.

You haven’t read Salmon of Doubt, by the way, have you?

The Real Shliach said...

I have not had the pleasure.

Crawling Axe said...

One story from it.

One of my favorite parts:

“We were ushered graciously aboard. One attendant offered us glasses of champagne while another stood guard by the sliding glass doors which led into the air-conditioned interior.

“His job was to push them open for us. He explained that this had become necessary because unfortunately the doors didn't open automatically when you approached them, and some of their Japanese visitors would often just stand in front of them for whole minutes getting increasingly bewildered and panic-stricken until someone slid them open by hand.”

The Real Shliach said...

Why have I never seen that website before?

Crawling Axe said...

Because you’re a frum Jew who spends his free time on holy things?

Crawling Axe said...

When DNA was alive, he had his short stories there. Now he still has them, but there is no short story section, so you have to search for them. But, they are all in the Salmon of Doubt.

The Real Shliach said...

1. Oh, of course!

2. Perhaps this book I should buy.

Crawling Axe said...

It has a cool story about a rhino which I could find anywhere online.

Next time I am in New York area (around the 18th), I could lend it to you.

The Real Shliach said...

2. Why are you coming (email acceptable)?

3. Not only you could, but you should. Right now I'm in the middle of "The Guns of August", but I'm sure that could wait.

Crawling Axe said...

2. You will not believe me, but the last time I was in NY, I forgot to buy that pair of tzitzis. Bizarrely enough, I got a volume of Mittler Rebbe’s Imrei Binah instead, which I am now going to learn with my shliach. Is my life crazy or what?

3. It’s a deal. Would you like something by Richard Dawkins while we’re at it?

just another said...

There are shluchim in Simferopol!

She has a photoblog!

It is nice!

photoblog.com/chossid

Crawling Axe said...

After the war, my grandfather moved from Simferopol to Dnepropetrovsk (actually, he moved from Lithuania where he was hunting Green Brothers). But I’ve been to Simferopol, when I was in Crimea.

Crawling Axe said...

(Sadly, the only thing about it that I remember is persimmons.)

The Real Shliach said...

2. So all in all life turned out ok.

3. No, I wouldn't want to bring any new testament literature into my house.

Just Another: Thanks, duly noted, and it will be checked out.

CA: Green Brothers?

My wife loves persimmons.

Crawling Axe said...

2. I still need a pair of tzitzis.
3. Actually, atheist.

Green Brothers = Lithuanian anti-Russian partisans.

I hate persimmons. Too sweet and chindrippedy.

The Real Shliach said...

2. Right, but if you had gotten the tzitzis in the first place it's unlikely that you'd have come back for the Imrei Bina.

3. Exactly.

He fought the anti-Russians?

According to my wife you've never had a persimmon until you've had an Israeli persimmon.

Crawling Axe said...

2. That is probably true. The way I got Imrei Binah was a complete accident and not of my making (it was a present).

3. But so is Douglas Adams.

Yes.

The only persimmon I’ve had in my entire life was an Israeli persimmon. It was brought by my uncle from Israel. I tasted it, deemed it too sweet, and put persimmons into the category of foods I don’t like. Then, when I was in Crimea, I tried it again, and decided that Ukrainian (or Turkish) persimmons are indeed as sweet as Israeli ones.

Crawling Axe said...

I guess the last paragraph was self-contradictory. I did not try the same persimmon again in Crimea, even though this is what it seems I said.

The Real Shliach said...

3. Yes, but he's funny.

Why?

Perhaps you have an immature palate. Or else, as I always say, you can't argue with taste.

Crawling Axe said...

So is Richard Dawkins, at times. His stuff is also interesting. At times.

As a soldier of the Red Army. He became one after being liberated from a concentration camp in Germany.

It’s very possible that my palate is immature regarding persimmons. I am fully convinced that if I wanted to, I could make myself like them. I did it before, with olives.

The Real Shliach said...

3. Hmm. Well, maybe.

Well, I suppose that's a legitimate reason.

Well there you go then.

Crawling Axe said...

The reason I would do it is I trust G-d. Because He made persimmons for our enjoyment, and I am not enjoying them, the problem is with me, not with G-d. In the case of music, for example, I would not go so far.

The Real Shliach said...

How is music any different than fruit? I bet you that persimmons have been selectively bred through the years to be more of whatever it is that persimmons are known for, taking them far away from G-d's original persimmon. Music, a creation of G-d, is similarly endowed.

Crawling Axe said...

That is an excellent question, which demands an equally excellent answer, about which I will think in car.

But to give a preview: taste in music is more correlated with intelligence and education than taste in raw fruit, which is more correlated with more vegetative, instinctive aspects of brain function (notice that I say raw fruit, not more complicated things like fine wine or fine cooking). I consider myself much more intelligent and educated than average masses (it’s not a display of my usual snobbery, but an objective fact). I don’t consider myself in any way superior in other areas.

The Real Shliach said...

Well, I'll give you a chance to fully flesh out your argument, because frankly, I have no clue what you're talking about.

Crawling Axe said...

That is lamentable.

What I am trying to say is that although taste in fruit does develop through time, it tends to stay more constant and more dependent on the body’s aspects that have less to do with intelligence. So, persimmons catch up with us, not we with persimmons (they are bred to be more tasty according to already existing taste). At the same time, in the case of music, the more intelligent a person is and the more exposure he has had to different kinds of music (most importantly, Classical music), the more likely he is to have good taste.

If some fruit is widely popular, but I don’t like it, it’s my problem. If I don’t like the music, it could be my problem, but it could also be that the music sucks. The second alternative is more probable in the case of music than in the case of fruit.

In other words, taste in fruit is more instinctive. Taste in music is more dependent on one’s intelligence and education. When I was talking about trusting G-d, I should have mentioned G-d creating human body and persimmon.

The Real Shliach said...

Why is taste in fruit any more instinctive than taste in music? Perhaps taste for the original fruit, but not this genetically modified charlatan.

Again, you're assuming that liking classical music is a sign of intelligence, and once again I dispute this.

Crawling Axe said...

Taste is more instinctive than hearing. Taste in taste (gustation) is more instinctive than in music. If you want to, you can ask why, and I’ll give some confusing half-thought explanation, but the bottom line is: hearing is more important to us as a tool for communication, expression and understanding of the world than gustatory taste.

I didn’t say that liking Classical music is a sign of higher intelligence (even though I believe that). I said that exposure to Classical music in my opinion has a higher chance to develop one’s taste in music. Listen to a piece of Classical music. It has more moving parts than any modern piece. Its authors had more musical education. It is most likely based on longer tradition. It is more effective in relaying emotion. It is a piece of artwork in and of itself, not an auxiliary to, say, poetry.

I am not saying that this alone makes it a better music (although I do believe that’s the case); I am saying that playing a sport which involves 10 muscle groups vs. 1 makes you more athletic.

[In the same way, Chabad Chassidus is superior to Chagas Chassidus and Judaism is superior to, lehavdil, any other religion. Purely from intellectual point of view.]

tRP could explain this so much better than me (even though he would probably disagree or say something like “well, automobile lights are not as shiny in a puddle of clear water as they are in the puddles of oily water”. Damn artistic people...).

Crawling Axe said...

Plus, more of our brain is concerned with hearing and information obtained from hearing than with taste. If you want to know, taste is the only modality which doesn’t need to go through thalamus. I don’t know what this means exactly (presumably something to do with thalamic reticular nucleus, consciousness and synchronization of information, but that would be just a guess), but it must means something terribly important.

I wonder if the same is true with visual art vs. music. I am not necessarily sure...

The Real Shliach said...

Which is exactly why it's so very terrible for your soul.

(what is? Take your pick)

Crawling Axe said...

Alcohol is terrible for your brain too. So is not sleeping late at night. But we use them to achieve certain goals.

Would I torture my children’s neshamas with Classical music? Would tRP torture his children’s neshamos? Both are good questions. I can tell you one thing: I would definitely torture tRP’s children’s neshamos.

The Real Shliach said...

Classical music? I was talking about persimmons of course.

Crawling Axe said...

You said “take a pick”. Why would I pick a persimmon over a piece of Classica music? (I actually wonder what your wife would pick.)

Crawling Axe said...

Have I told you before about my theory about why soccer is the most superior of all sports, and how baseball is about as interesting as a game of paper-rock-and-scissors?

The Real Shliach said...

Because persimmons are for more interesting than classical music.

Ask her. (I'd ask her myself [I am sitting right next to her, after all] but she'd give me a strange look).

The Real Shliach said...

I'll disagree (if Einstein could be a baseball fan than so can I) but sure, go ahead. Better yet, make it a new post so that everyone can participate.

Crawling Axe said...

Only if you look at them from biological point of view.

She said nothing beats a CD with Elgar's Cello Concerto in E Minor as a present.

Fine.

The Real Shliach said...

What do you think occupies my every thought?

Liar liar pants on fire.

Excellent.

Crawling Axe said...

Eibeshter? The Rebbe? Your wife?

Fine, she didn't say it. But that's what she really wants as an anniversary present.

The Real Shliach said...

Ahh, the holy trinity!

Yeah. Sure.

thanbo said...

isn't that falshe fish, what ppl used to make on Pesach instead of gefullte fish, because the fish was packed in flour?